Prince Albert Vocabulary 101: Top 20 P.A. Words & Phrases

prince albert words and phrases

Across the world, people of different regions develop a dialect unique to the residents of that area. While some may think that Saskatchewan folks, in general, have a distinct accent, they have not yet met the residents of Prince Albert. Even those who no longer live in Prince Albert cannot hide their true roots: at one time or another the “P.A. talk” comes out.

You Know You're From Prince Albert When…

We Prince Albertans are known for our great sense of humour and even greater mastery of sarcasm. This cannot be more exemplary than in the way we talk. Commonly referred to as the “gateway to the north” of Saskatchewan we are typically known for being the last big city before heading up to lake country. However, we are more than just the “gateway to the north” we have a distinctly awesome dialect — in fact, our P.A. vocabulary put us on the map. In 2014, a McDonald’s billboard featuring P.A. slang went viral across the internet, making our Prince Albert tongue famous around the globe.

poor deal anywayz
Image source:

Top 20 P.A. words and phrases you should know

At Lakeland Ford, we decided to compile our favourite P.A. slang terms for our enjoyment and possibly as a means of translation for anyone not from our neck of the woods. Here are our favourite Prince Albert sayings or slang terms defined, with a general theme of driving or getting a sweet deal at your very own Lakeland Ford in the heart of Prince Albert.

1. Anywayz (adverb) - a non-standard form of the word “anyway”. Typically used at the end of a sentence to emphasize the sentence’s meaning.

Example: “He’s got a poor ride from Lakeland Ford, anywayz?”
lakeland ford anywayz
2. You’re Poor/Hardly Poor (phrase) - you are awesome/cool/great. Used in a form meant in the opposite context.
Example: “You’re hardly poor in your sweet F-150, cuz.”
hardly poor
3. Not Even (phrase) - No way.

Example: Person 1: “Can I get a ride to work with you?”

Person 2: “Not even cuz.”

not even
4. Cuz (noun) - cousin, friend. This can be a first cousin, second cousin, or even distantly related. There may be no blood relation but a kinship or some sort to distinguish a familial type bond.
Example: “Hey, cuz. You want to take me to Lakeland Ford to get my new whip?”
5. Small Deal/Poor Deal (phrase) - The opposite of a small deal. This, in fact, is a large and great deal.
Example: “Small deal you didn’t get on your truck from Lakeland Ford cuz?”
small deal from lakeland ford
6. Ever Sick (phrase) - Awesome/deadly.
Example: “This new loaded truck of mine is ever sick, cuz.”
ever sick truck
7. You’re Smart (phrase) - Phrase used when telling someone they are not actually making the smartest decision.
Example: “You’re smart going to another dealership besides Lakeland Ford.”
you're smart
8. “Haaaaaah” (sound) - a laugh but not a laugh. Used to indicate that one is not serious about their statement, but it was meant in a joking manner. Used to entice laughter from the speaker’s audience.
Example: “Time for a new ride there cuz, er what? Haaaaaaaah.”
9. You’re Loose (phrase)- the opposite of loose. “You’re Loose” indicates that you are actually being stingy or tight with money, possessions, etc.

Example: “You’re loose to drive the same old truck around. It’s time to get a new one eh cuz.”

you're loose
10. You’re Tight (phrase)- the opposite of tight. “Your tight” indicates that you are actually a bit too giving with your money or possessions etc.
Example: “They’re tight anywayz at Lakeland Ford. Look at the poor deal I got.”
they're tight
11. As If (phrase) - No way, whatever.
Example: “As if, like he got a deal like that from Lakeland Ford.”
as if lakeland ford
Interesting Fact: You may have thought that only Valley Girls say “as if”, but indeed we keep saying it in P.A. We aren’t sure if the movie Clueless had any impact on whether we started saying it or not, but we keep on saying it and no, we don’t say it anything like Alicia Silverstone did.

12. Chilly (adjective) - The opposite of cold, but in fact warm.
Example: “It not chilly in here anywayz. Turn up the A/C cuz.”
13. Cute (adjective) - Not actually looking cute but in fact the opposite, to look foolish or ridiculous.
Example: “I’d be cute driving a Chevy. I’m getting a Ford, cuz.”
i'd be cute
14. Chip Ins (phrase) - When everyone chips in towards buying something to be shared amongst the group. Can be referred to for any type of financial contribution towards a single product.
Example: “Who has chip ins for gas? I’m not paying for it all myself.”
chip ins
15. Hardly (adverb) - Not hardly, but in fact, quite a bit. Used in the opposite context to mean a lot.
Example: “Hardly much chrome on this truck to be poor.”
hardly much

16. Small/Tiny (adjective) - Not small or tiny but in fact quite large. Used in the opposite context.

Example: “Small truck that guy isn’t driving.”
small tiny
17. Shy/Shy Much/Right Shy (phrase) - Not, in fact, shy but quite outgoing or show-offy.
Example: “You’d be shy to lift your truck that much anywayz.”
you'd be shy
18. Hoolay/Hoolah (adjective) - extended form of the word “holy”, used for emphasis.
Example: “Hoolay, you’re driving a Ford nowadays?”
hoolay hoolah
19. You Don’t Even (phrase) - Yes, you do actually. The opposite of actual context.
Example: “You don’t even wish you had my truck bro.”
you don't even wish
20. Nice (adjective) - The opposite of nice. Used to make fun of someone.
Example: “Nice truck cuz. Time to get a new one!”
nice truck bro

The secret to speaking like you’re from Prince Albert

If you have noticed a theme, there is a large one: sarcasm. Many of the words in phrases are used sarcastically in the opposite context of what the word actually is, e.g. “loose” means tight and “tight” means loose. When in doubt, think of things used in the opposite of the context of what it actually means and you’re hardly deadly then (are good to go)!

Advanced P.A. speak

For the more advanced, P.A. vocabularist, the words can be combined in a long string or chain.


    • As if, you’re loose to be tight cuz. Haaaaah.

    • Not even, ever sick anyways cuz.

advanced prince albert speak

Pro Tip: Sentences may be inflected to sound like a question, or even phrased like a question when they are indeed a statement. Think of these types of sentences as rhetorical questions.

Did we miss any P.A. terms?

When you come to Lakeland Ford fellow Prince Albert peeps, fear not. We speak your language! If you have any examples we missed that you think we should add, let us know. We hope to grow this list as the ultimate guide to P.G. P.A. vocabulary.